English at elementary schools: blame the Dunglish teachers

I was zapping at dinner and I heard sibilant English coming out of the telly on the children’s news (ZAPP TV), so I sat down and listened. The whole discussion was about having elementary school children learn English at that level instead of in secondary school, according to some government report. The people opposed to it believe that there are more important things to learn and that learning English in secondary school is faster and more efficient than in elementary school.

That last bit is not true for three reasons: 1) The level of English is already not so hot, which is the reason for being on telly in the first place (duh), 2) in my native Canada, they teach a second language (English or French) at elementary schools to produce as many functionally bilingual children as possible. They decided this back in the 70s or early 80s when they realised that learning at secondary level was too late, 3) It is a fact that any language should be put into a child’s head before age 7, as everything goes in easier.

In front of an entire classroom of children and a television camera, the male teacher said “Please take in front of you your book at page 39.” This Dutchman claimed that his English was good and that the children learned good English from him. Dude, this isn’t English! And then one of his students, a little blond boy was asked how he would address the baker in England when he goes there with his family on vacation. “Can I have a bread?” he said.

Did anyone pick up on the fact that this isn’t English? Anyone? Does anyone check or do they just assume they’re brilliant? It’s nuts.

Another telly channel (RTL4) also did the same piece blaming the teachers and spared us the Dunglish.

Knowing how underpaid teachers are, I wouldn’t expect any less than Dunglish.

Tags: , ,

36 Responses to “English at elementary schools: blame the Dunglish teachers”

  1. A.J. says:

    I’ll just assume they’re brilliant instead of “assume their brillant” 😉

  2. Natashka says:

    Ah yes, (hitting my forehead) brillant (FR), brilliant (EN). 🙂

  3. Jay Vos says:

    Right on with reason 3. I’ve no degree in linguistics, but even I learned that in my cursory orientation as an ESL volunteer.

    Which makes me question the language teacher’s own schooling, expertise and abilities!

  4. Koos says:

    I’m looking at “Please take in front of you your book at page 39.” trying to figure out what exactly is wrong with it. I would formulate it differently, but I don’t see what’s wrong with this particular phrasing.

    Also, I think A.J. was trying to point you to two errors in one phrase. “Their” is possessive, where “They’re” is short for They are. So I think you meant to say either “their brilliance” or “they’re brilliant”, probably the latter.

    Leave lingual errors in thy complains about lingual errors and thou shall be mocked 😉

  5. Natashka says:

    Thanks. I wrote this too quickly!

  6. Ludolph says:

    @Koos:
    “complains”? “thou shall”?

  7. Emerald Rose says:

    I didn’t see the report on Zapp TV, but did see the bit on RTL4 Nieuws and know what you’re talking about.

    I teach English at secondary school level and find the level has declined in years instead of raised. You would think with the amount of information through various forms of media (television, radio, internet, etc) that the level of English would have improved? No, unfortunately this is not the case. I blame the “Tweede Fase” for a bit of this, though. Since it has been introduced, language learning has deteriorated to the point that HAVO students at exam level are reading books at VMBO or even 3nd form level (age 14/15), rather than exam level books for their oral exams in English.

    I agree that learning a language at an early age is better. In fact, I took a course at university here in the Netherlands which has shown that children who learn a foreign language at an early age learn it better than if they learn it while in their formative years (read: teen years). Children who learn a language before the age of 10 tend not to question the rules of grammar whereas the older a child or adult is, the more they question why certain things are said in certain ways.

    Ok, I’ll get off my soap box now. Thanks for allowing me to get my two cents in, by the way 😉

  8. x says:

    @Koos

    Um sorry, maybe your comments reaffirm the whole point of the article, which is that most Dutch apparently are so confident in their English ability that they don’t know when they are wrong!

    I have no idea how the guy came up with ““Please take in front of you your book at page 39.” and “Can I have a bread?”, because that certainly couldn’t have come off an English TV programme (unless it was a show mocking Dunglish). “Please take in front of you your book at page 39.” is totally wrong. Firstly, how do you “Take in front of you your book”. He probably means “Take the book (that is) in front of you”. You can’t just put words in whatever order you feel like and call that English. Why are the kids learning English from these teachers, because they learn better English from just watching TV? If you cover their ears from Dunglish, I think they would be perfectly functionally bilingual without the added corruption from adults who obviously all learnt English from some other Dutch dude who also didn’t know English.

    Koos: “Leave lingual errors in thy complains about lingual errors and thou shall be mocked”
    Yeah, you’re certainly prophetic, *mocks :P. It would be better if you said linguistical, and ‘complaints’ is the noun you were looking for.

    All the suggestions that its easier to learn language younger is supported by research. But I think the Dunglish problem isn’t that the children aren’t learning it early enough, it seems like the teachers have no idea what is correct grammatically in English and what isn’t, so wouldn’t it be technically worse if these same teachers started teaching younger children!? Then they’re really screwed… they won’t even question “Can I have a bread?”, and then you would have a Dunglish epidemic :P.

  9. x says:

    *All the suggestions that it is easier to learn a language at a younger age is supported by research
    *they’d really be screwed… they wouldn’t

    See English isn’t easy even for native English speakers :s… the tense has to be consistent also.

  10. Ludolph says:

    Firstly, how do you “Take in front of you your book”. He probably means “Take the book (that is) in front of you”.

    I don’t think that is what he means. ‘Neem (take) het boek voor je’: given a classroom situation, he more likely meant to say ‘produce the book that is not yet in front of you but still in your schoolbag’. In this case the Dutch ‘voor je’ (in front of you), is destination, not present location. He should have said ‘put’, not ‘take’.

  11. Emerald Rose says:

    @x: yes, it’s easier for a child to pick up a foreign language at an earlier age, but not if it’s taught by a non-native speaker. So in many ways I agree with you here. In fact, on the news, they reported that many schools would like to have a (near) native speaker teach English lessons so that the level of English at primary schools can/will improve. The suggestion was to have students of English (or from the teacher training programme) teach the English lessons. While that sounds fine, I’m wondering how many students of English are really willing to teach? And those who are doing the teacher training programme to teach English at secondary school want to teach secondary school children, not primary school children.

    @Koos, I have to agree with x about the confidence of Dutch speakers here. Unfortunately, I have come across many English teachers (Dutch natives) whose English is not that great, hence the problem with Dutch students learning English. They pick up on their teachers’ mistakes and keep repeating them. I’ve actually had to correct a colleague’s English on a test for 1st year bilingual class as it still contained a few grammatical mistakes. We’re talking about a type of education in which students should speak both languages fluently by the time they finish that type of schooling.

    Alas, even with the exposure to English on TV, internet, radio and other media, English in the Netherlands will not improve. As long as we’ve got children who refuse to read and prefer to chat using MSN/text message language levels will continue to decline. Yes, I’m a sceptic. Sue me.

  12. Ludolph says:

    “I have come across many English teachers (Dutch natives) whose English is not that great, hence the problem with Dutch students learning English.”
    Er zijn in Nederland al middelbare scholen die dit onderkennen, en gebruik maken van toegevoegde ‘native speakers’ voor conversatie in vreemde talen.

    “Alas, even with the exposure to English on TV, internet, radio and other media, English in the Netherlands will not improve.”
    Waarom zou tv, radio, popmuziek niet helpen? Veruit het meeste komt uit Engelstalige landen en kan heel goed als voorbeeld dienen. Vergelijk de situatie in Nederland met bijvoorbeeld die in Frankrijk, waar uit elke Engelstalig tv-programma, interview, film, computerspel al het Engels van hogerhand verwijderd wordt en vervangen door Frans. Het niveau van het gesproken Engels van een Franse scholier is (daardoor?) nog dramatisch veel slechter dan dat van een Nederlandse scholier.
    Maar het heeft wel als positief gevolg dat het ‘Franglais’ lang niet zo’n vlucht heeft genomen als het Dunglish; Fransen hebben zelden de behoefte zich onnodig van het Engels te bedienen.

    Dat MSN/text-taaltje heeft inderdaad niet veel meer met correct Engels (of Nederlands) te maken, maar kinderen doen hier vaak aan ‘code switching’: als er een serieuze tekst geschreven moet worden gaat de knop om en verandert de taal. Komt wel goed.

  13. Larry says:

    @Koos:
    ‘I’m looking at “Please take in front of you your book at page 39.” trying to figure out what exactly is wrong with it. I would formulate it differently, but I don’t see what’s wrong with this particular phrasing’

    Because it’s completely unidiomatic; the teacher is using a literal translation and completely ignoring the possibility that English might express this request differently: ‘Please open your books [addressing multiple students, so ‘book’ is in the plural, contrary to Dutch usage] at page 39′ or ‘Get out your books and turn to page 39’.

  14. Larry says:

    @Emerald Rose:

    >I teach English at secondary school level and find the level has declined in years instead of raised.

    The level has declined instead of *risen*

    >I blame the “Tweede Fase” for a bit of this, though. Since it has been introduced, language learning has deteriorated

    Since it *was* introduced

  15. Natashka says:

    Larry is right on the money, super 🙂

    @Koos if you don’t see what’s wrong, then you need to learn English syntax (word order).

  16. Anna says:

    The issue is that the people that are teaching the children English in elementary school are not English teachers. It’s just the regular teacher that teaches an hour of English a week. So, if you look at it that way it’s probably better if they don’t have English lessons in elementary school. Better to be taught the right way a little later than the wrong way very early on.

    I don’t think the level of English in the Netherlands is that low though, especially compared to the level in other countries.

  17. Larry says:

    Natasha, you do realize that your use of ‘zapping’ in the first sentence is Dunglish, right? It’s called channel surfing i English. I really wish Kees van Kooten’s suggestion of calling it ‘kanaalzwemmen’ had caught on instead of ‘zappen’.

  18. Natashka says:

    @Larry Nope, I do mean zapping. In Canada we call it zapping, too. In Québec French, they say “zapper”.

  19. Larry says:

    I’ve never heard anyone calling it zapping in English, in Canada or elsewhere. I’ll take your word for it on the French, but then it wouldn’t be the first time that French had ‘borrowed’ something that didn’t actually exist in English (and vice versa). Could be that it has made its way into Quebec English, but … hmm, I’d better stop before I say something uncharitable.

  20. Larry says:

    Wait, are you talking about zapping as in just changing channels to see what (else) is on (i.e., zappen) or changing channels because there are commercials on the channel you were watching (which appears to be what zapping is starting to be used to mean in English: http://www.nytimes.com/1991/07/08/business/the-media-business-tv-industry-unfazed-by-rise-in-zapping.html)?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Channel_surfing
    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zapping

  21. Chantal says:

    Op zich vind ik dit wel een aardige internetpagina, maar toch vraag ik me af waarom wij Nederlanders het accepteren dat iemand van buitenlandse komaf, die zelf blijkbaar niet voldoende Nederlands kent om haar site in het Nederlands te schrijven, ons aanspreekt op verkeerd gebruik van de Engelse taal. Wat ik nog minder begrijp is waarom hele groepen Nederlanders vervolgens in het Engels gaan reageren en elkaar op ieder foutje gaan afrekenen. Mensen, onze moedertaal is Nederlands. Het is normaal dat we ons kunnen redden in een wereldtaal als Engels, maar ik vind het onzin om te verwachten dat we dit op een hoog literair niveau beheersen. Al was het alleen al omdat verreweg de meeste engelstalige mensen hun eigen taal niet foutloos kunnen schrijven. Overigens zijn de meeste Nederlanders ook niet in staat een verhaal te schrijven zonder taalfouten. Waarom verwachten we dan wel dat we Engels foutloos beheersen? Wij verwachten toch ook niet dat iemand die niet van oorsprong Nederlands is, de Nederlandse taal foutloos spreekt en schrijft? Kortom: we maken allemaal wel eens een fout. Dat maakt ons toch niet meteen dom of minderwaardig?

  22. Larry says:

    @Chantal: Het gaat er helemaal niet om of iemand het Engels wel of niet op een ‘hoog literair niveau’ beheerst. In de meeste voorbeelden die Natasha geeft is er sprake van vrij eenvoudige zinnen of termen waarin fouten zitten die voorkomen hadden kunnen zijn als ze maar door iemand waren nagekeken. Ik geloof niet dat het de bedoeling van deze site is Nederlanders over hun kennis van het Engels af te kraken, wel om te laten zien dat bedrijven en andere instanties in Nederland vaak geen aandacht aan de kwaliteit van hun Engels (en andere talen) schenken. Dat is vooral vervelend als men zich juist op een Engelstalig dan wel anderstalig publiek richt.

    Tot slot schrijft Natasha deze site in het Engels ten eerste omdat het over het Engels gaat en zij het makkelijker vindt (denk ik) de fouten in het Engels uit te leggen en ten tweede juist omdat zij zich in die taal meer op haar gemak voelt (geloof ik).

    Jij zou toch ook eerder een website in het Nederlands maken? Of niet soms?

  23. Luc says:

    Chantal heeft volledig gelijk, te meer daar de schrijfster van deze stukjes over “dunglish” zelden zonder venijn schrijft. Reuzejammer, want dan krijg je zo’n flauw sfeertje dat haar Nederlands niet zou deugen – wat tot op zeker hoogte waar is, maar je kunt ook stellen dat ze voor een buitenlandse het Nederlands zij het niet foutloos (zie haar eigen schreden op het Nederlandse-columnpad) toch wel verdomd goed beheerst. En je wordt zelf zo’n mierenneuker van het gemierenneuk. Laatst in dat stukje over Oostenrijk: allemaal clichés over de Duitse taal en het zangerig Oostenrijks, wat een gebakken lucht. En dan de ‘early adapter’, reuze flauw om zo over iemand heen te vallen die helemaal niet pretendeert Engels te spreken, maar gewoon, zonder succes, gevat wil zijn. De hele argumentatie van dat stukje raakte trouwens kant noch wal.
    Schrijft mevrouw criticaster ‘their’ ipv ‘they’re’ (behoorlijk tenenkrommend en absoluut vergelijkbaar met de ‘early adapter’) is het in ene een tikfout. Kortom, sympathiek is het niet. Waarom dan toch deze site bezocht? De frictie tussen talen heeft mijn interesse en op het eerste oog meende ik hier goede voorbeelden te zien. Het ziet ernaar uit dat ik afknappende ben.

    Wat betreft Larry’s vraag ‘Jij zou toch ook eerder een website in het Nederlands maken? Of niet soms?’.
    Ik kan niet voor Chantal spreken, maar kijk eens rond op internet: allemaal Engelstalige sites van niet Engelstalige mensen. De plus bij de min: een grote wereldwijde virtuele goudmijn voor sites als deze.

  24. Ludolph says:

    Chantal,
    De voertaal op dit weblog is Engels, simpelweg omdat het Natasha’s engelstalige weblog is. En ‘when in Rome …’.
    Maar je hebt ook wel een punt – het fenomeen Dunglish is alleen maar interessant voor wie beide talen enigszins kent; je mag er dus vanuit gaan dat het Nederlands hier door iedereen verstaan wordt. Ik twijfel op dit blog ook wel eens tussen enerzijds beleefdheid (de taal van de gastvrouw gebruiken) en anderzijds gemak (Nederlands gebruiken, wat ik beter beheers). Ik kies dan voor het gemak, maar dat heeft toch iets bots, naar mijn gevoel.

    “… die zelf blijkbaar niet voldoende Nederlands kent om haar site in het Nederlands te schrijven, ons aanspreekt op verkeerd gebruik van de Engelse taal.”
    Een goede passieve kennis van het Nederlands, zoals Natasha kennelijk heeft, is voldoende om te herkennen waar de typische Dunglish blunders vandaan komen. Bovendien, Dunglish is niet alleen maar het verkeerd gebruik van de Engelse taal, het is daarbij het onnodig gebruik ervan. Fout Engels maakt nog geen Dunglish. Daarom gaat de vergelijking met Natasha’s Nederlands al niet op.

  25. Larry says:

    @Ludolph:
    ‘Bovendien, Dunglish is niet alleen maar het verkeerd gebruik van de Engelse taal, het is daarbij het onnodig gebruik ervan. Fout Engels maakt nog geen Dunglish.’

    Precies. Dat men in Nederland zo vaak om commerciële redenen naar het Engels grijpt is op zich niet zo heel erg, wel dat het keer op keer fout gaat en/of onbegrijpelijk is.

  26. Jos says:

    There seems to be a tendency to simply translate the words of a sentence in one’s native language into English and then call that a sentence in English.
    In most cases, that will not be a problem, and people will understand most of what’s being said. In other cases, the result is hilarious, and this site has shown with a good bunch of examples.
    It shows and teaches people that playing with languages can actually be fun.
    (one of my favorites is “Make it a little!” – I admit it’s a bit childish, but it still makes me smile..)

    To many native English speakers, a sentence that consists of English words but that shows a ‘different’ underlying grammatical construction, can either work as funny, or charming, or stupid, or as an example of somone at least making the effort; all depending on their own ‘openmindness’.

    Basically, the English language has a unique position of being perceived as one of the most easy-to-learn languages in the world, yet it also is one of the most inconsistently spelled and ponounced languages on the planet. For the Dutch readers of this, here’s an example: spelling – ‘street’, pronunciation – ‘striet’ and meaning – ‘straat’…

    And another one: “ghoti” – this is a classic. This is alledgedly the correct fonetic English spelling for “fish” — with the ‘gh’ of ‘laugh’, the ‘o’ of ‘women’ and the ‘ti’ of ‘station’.

  27. Regon says:

    Een mooie ogen-opener om mee te beginnen:

    “Nederlands gebruiken, wat ik beter beheers”
    Nederlands gebruiken, dat ik beter beheers

    Deze internetpagina volg ik met veel interesse, deels omdat ik op latere leeftijd meer en meer belangstelling voor taal heb gekregen en deels omdat ik meer en beter Engels zou willen begrijpen. De hoop dat ik mij ooit goed in Engels zou kunnen uitdrukken heb ik laten varen. Begrijpen blijft voor mij het sleutelwoord. Ben het dus ook geheel met Chantal eens dat ik, gezien de dubbeltaligheid van deze pagina, ik in het Nederlands kan en mag reageren.

    En als je echt alles wilt weten:
    http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html#errors

    Gezien de bedoeling van deze pagina zou het mij aangenaam zijn om, daar waar Dunglish gesignaleerd wordt; “Can I have a bread” deze aan te vullen met de juiste vorm.
    @Ludolph, daar waar jij je in het Nederlands wilt uitdrukken, zal je eerder ondersteunend dan onbeleefd zijn.

    @Luc, probeer nog even een positieve move, eh pardon…beweging, in plaats van “Het ziet ernaar uit dat ik afknappende ben”.

    Tenslotte, het gaat over communicatie.

    Met evengoed een vriendelijke groet………………….Regon

  28. Ludolph says:

    @Regon,
    Ik ben het niet eens met je correctie op mijn ‘wat’. Het is weliswaar ‘het kind dat daar loopt’, maar mijn constructie was als in ‘lopen, wat je als kind leert’. Niemand zegt ‘lopen, dat je als kind leert’. Je zou nog wel kunnen zeggen ‘het lopen dat je als kind leert’, maar dan moet je wel eerst het werkwoord verzelfstandigen.

  29. Mohamed Idris says:

    I thought the Dutch, along with Scandinavians, are among the most proficient speakers of English in Continental Europe. This is at least what one reads in the literature and what studies have consistently shown. Perhaps the competition was held between non-native speakers and that’s why the standards may have been lowered…

  30. PieterH says:

    The first time I had to learn English in school (MAVO), the teachers just assumed we already spoke English well enough. At the school thereafter (MBO) this hadn’t changed. Also, some teachers’ accents just hurt my ears. But really, I don’t think anybody has learned English by going to school. (Oh, and teachers are far from underpaid in my opinion.)

  31. Reinier says:

    IMHO you’re being unnecessarily harsh here. Is there any English-speaking baker that will not understand “Can I have a bread”?

    Also remember that many conversations in English in Europe are between non-native speakers only. I’ve seen such conversations that were just as pleasant and productive as they were violating native English grammar.

  32. Larry says:

    We don’t know if the teacher corrected the boy who said ‘Can I have a bread?’ (which is the kind of mistake a beginning student of English might be expected to make).

  33. kristof says:

    Fact is that the Dutch aren’t that bad at English. Sure, I love to point and laugh at them, but compared to the Germans, French, Spanish, Moroccon, South-African, Israeli, Thai and most other nationalities, the Dutch aren’t doing that bad a job at English.

    I’d love to know what your level of Dutch is, and if we should make fun of your “Endutch” 😉

  34. Larry says:

    @kristof: South Africans are bad at English?

  35. Pee-Tor says:

    ‘Vacation’ is not English. Holidays is. 😛

  36. Chrisi Mauer says:

    Views can be shared.

Powered by WordPress - Copyright © 2005-2020 Oh La La, The Netherlands. All rights reserved.